Areas of Expertise

  • European (in)security politics
  • European integration and EU foreign, security, and neighborhood policies
  • Neo-Idealism
  • EU-Ukraine relations
  • European geopolitics, global ordering, and geostrategy
  • Borders, mobility, and migration
  • International politics of identity, culture, and the future
  • Germany (including the Zeitenwende), the UK, and Central and Eastern Europe

Short Bio

Dr. Benjamin Tallis joined DGAP in September 2022. He is senior research fellow and runs the project  “Action Group Zeitenwende“, where he hosts the podcast "BerlinSide Out". 

He previously worked for the EU on security missions in Ukraine and the Balkans and was policy officer at the European Centre of Excellence for Civilian Crisis Management in Berlin.

Tallis spent five years at the Institute of International Relations Prague where he headed the Centre for European Security, advised numerous European governments, edited the journal New Perspectives, and created the 2017 Prague Insecurity Conference. He worked at the Hertie School in Berlin and the Institute for Peace Research and Security Policy at the University of Hamburg (IFSH). At the latter, he advised the German government on the future of European security and curated the 2019 Hamburg Insecurity Sessions. He contributed to the drafting of the 2016 EU Global Strategy and advised on visa liberalization for Ukraine in 2017.

Tallis holds a doctorate from the University of Manchester, regularly appears in the media, and has been published in Foreign PolicyPoliticoThe Independent, and in leading academic journals including International Studies QuarterlySecurity Dialogue, and Cooperation and Conflict. He is the author of the books To Ukraine with Love: Essays on Russia’s War and Europe’s Future (2022) and Identities, Borderscapes, Orders: (In)Security, (Im)Mobility, and Crisis in the EU and Ukraine (2023). 

Languages

English, German, Czech

 

[Last updated: February 2024]

Contributions

Germany Needs a Strategy—Grand and Democratic

German leaders have long been reluctant to discuss, let alone set, grand strategy. Now, with the world in flux and the old ways no longer working, Berlin needs to step up and clearly lay out what it wants—and how it plans to get it.

Author/s
Roderick Parkes
Florence Schimmel
Benjamin Tallis
IPQ
Creation date

Who’s Afraid of (Ukraine’s) Victory?

For Germany’s chancellor, victory seems to be the hardest word. This reluctance appears driven by fears of geopolitical change, which he seems hesitant to shape, let alone master, and by drawing the wrong lessons from German history.

Author/s
Benjamin Tallis
Julian Stöckle
IPQ
Creation date

The Zeitenwende Is Here, It’s Just Unevenly Distributed

At first it meant a “historical shift” that happened to Germany, now the term "Zeitenwende" is widely used to describe the country’s much-needed foreign and security policy rethink. Much has changed already, but important questions remain open.

Author/s
Benjamin Tallis
IPQ
Creation date

The Zeitenwende Beyond Germany

The Baltic States, Central Europe, France, the Nordic countries, the United Kingdom, and the United States have all reacted to Russia’s war of aggression against Ukraine in their own, but often similar ways.

Author/s
Jannik Hartmann
Kenny Kremer
Jacob Ross
et al.
IPQ
Creation date

Benjamin Tallis

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